​For the Love of Reading / Books I Read in October and November

october november books.jpg

I love reading books. I love the feeling I get when my brain starts to search for connections and reflections in my mind, and I appreciate eureka moments after realizing that the idea in the book has just unlocked something that was waiting for me in my mental capacities.

Have you ever thought that you picked up a book accidentally, but in actuality, it came to your hands on purpose, and it was all you needed at that particular moment? I had that feeling this autumn. Over the months of the fall season, I have read a couple of books that were just the right things at the right times for me. I am so happy that they appeared on my radar.

 

girls wash your face stop

Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be by Rachel Hollis (Audible version)

It was easy to listen to funny, sad, and intimate stories told by the author about accepting yourself, not trying to be the person others want you to be, and trying to be the best version of yourself.

 

21 Lesson

21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari (Audible version)

As in his previous book, Yuval Noah Harari writes again about humanity and what to expect in the short term. Some new ideas presented in this book include how to disconnect from everything around you, accept the moment, and value simple sensations like air going in and out of your lungs. It’s very similar to his previous books, but it’s like talking to your best friend – you meet and usually talk about the same topics every time, but you are never bored.

 

peak book

Peak How All of Us Can Achieve Extraordinary Things by Anders Ericsson and Robert Pool (Kindle Edition)

This was a recommendation from some friends we met during the summer holidays. The authors have very exciting ideas for raising extraordinary kids. They explained their concept of teaching and preparing a child for a future career from an early age. Imagine how much a surgeon could reach in his career if he would start his preparation and practice intentionally being 7 years old, not waiting until the end of school. I am not sure if that is the right way to raise a child, but the idea of becoming very good at something and the question of how to reach this goal inspired me to read this fantastic book. It was a very inspirational read that led to many discussions before bed and many lifestyle changes. For me, this book revealed the secret not about how to be the best, but how to work to be the best that you can be. I highly recommend this book.

 

Whiskey in a tea cup book

Whiskey in a Teacup by Reese Witherspoon (Kindle edition)

This is an incredibly sweet, intimate, light-mood book about childhood memories, family, beautiful living, get-togethers, music, love, motherhood, and almost everything. It’s an easy read through girlish pink glasses. I like it a lot. It sets such a good mood, leaves you with a nice cozy feeling, and gives you some ideas about the different types of music to listen to or a new South American food recipe to try.

 

The explosive child

The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children by Dr. Ross W. Green, Ph.D. (Audible version)

I was looking for some new ideas for solving kids’ behavior challenges and accidentally found this book. Even if the title sounds a bit aggressive and it seems like I am not in such trouble with my kids, the approach presented is the one I would like to follow with my family. This was something, an eye-opener. It is a quick book as it is only two and a half hours of listening, but it was enough to convince me. What I like the most is the real-life situational conversations between a child and a parent that you can try to apply in your daily life situations. I find this very helpful.

 

Raising human beings

Raising Human Beings: Creating a Collaborative Partnership with your Child by Ross W. Green (Audible version)

After listening to The Explosive Child, I decided to dive a bit deeper into the collaborative approach that Dr. Ross W. Green explained in that book and found another book written by him, which follows the same central idea and explains cultivating better parent-child relationships in more detail. Again, the text is full of conversational examples and detailed explanations. I am so happy I found those books. Lots of things have changed in our house after reading them.

 

Those are my autumn picks. I am so grateful I had an opportunity to read so different yet very influential books. What was the best book you read over the autumn?

 

 

 

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